The Canadian Vaping Association responded to a youth vaping report that recommends policy changes.

OTTAWA — The Canadian Vaping Association (CVA) responded to a report entitled, “The 2020-2021 Youth and Young Adult Vaping Project.”

It was produced by the Lung Association of Nova Scotia, Smoke-Free Nova Scotia, with funding support from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. The study claims that the results of a survey studying vaping trends among youth and young adults are evidence enough to support policy recommendations that include a flavor ban, taxation, stronger enforcement of sales regulations, an increase in the minimum legal sales age, and an increase in awareness of the potential for vaping to translate into smoking.

“There are many examples of carefully curated supporting research within the survey discussion,” said Darryl Tempest, the executive director of the CVA, in a press release.

“While misleading, none of these examples are as egregious as the reports claim that the United Kingdom has restricted flavors,” Tempest said. “The UK has taken no action to ban or restrict flavored vape products. Certain additives have been restricted, but the UK has implemented no restrictions on flavors. Public Health England is so confident in vaping’s relative risk and efficacy that it has run many campaigns encouraging smokers to switch to vaping and have even opened vape stores within the country’s hospitals. Whether the researchers are misinformed or knowingly included false information to persuade legislators, this oversight should call the legitimacy of the survey’s findings into question.”

The report also adds that the data in the report is merely a confirmation bias to support “the false claim that youth vaping rates continue to rise, while the current data finding a steep decline in youth vaping rates is completely omitted.”

Specifically, the survey studied youth in Nova Scotia as it pertains to flavors. In addition, a ban on flavored vaping products is believed to be ineffective and won’t do anything to reduce youth use throughout the province and the country.

“It is curious that the report chose not to collect this data and that no study has been conducted on youth vaping or flavor use in Nova Scotia since the flavor ban.”

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Michael McGrady is a columnist for Vaping Post's English edition. He is a critically acclaimed journalist with awards and recognition from across the industry. He was a finalist for ECigClick's annual vape awards in 2019 and 2020, a KAC Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship Fellow in 2019, among other honours. He is also the host of Vaping Weekly, the Post's podcast. All articles express his own opinion and do not necessarily reflect the Editor's view.