The study was published in the journal The Lancet Public Health earlier this month, and indicated that in China the prevalence of diabetes has increased by almost ten times, since the 80’s. Interestingly, other studies have shown that only about 50% of this increase in diabetes can be attributed to unhealthy eating habits, suggesting that the other 50% is caused by other lifestyle factors, such as smoking.

Heavy smokers were more likely to have higher abdominal fat than light or non-smokers, which also increased their risk for diabetes.
For the purpose of this research, the study authors recruited 512,891 adults 59% of which were women aged between 30 and 79. The participants were selected over a period of 4 years from ten diverse areas (five urban and five rural) across China, and subsequently were interviewed, and had physical measurements and blood samples taken.

The study participants were separated into four categories according to smoking history: never-smokers, ever-regular smokers, ex-smokers, and occasional smokers, while cases of diabetes were identified via local databases.

Heavy smokers are more likely to be overweight

The compiled data recorded 13,652 new-onset diabetes cases amongst 482 589 participants without previous diabetes. Additionally, heavy smokers were more likely to have higher abdominal fat than light or non-smokers, which also increased their risk.

Study author, Professor Zhengming Chen, from the University of Oxford, UK, said, “The excess smoking-associated risk of diabetes among men in China is likely to increase substantially in future generations because the tobacco epidemic is maturing, but also because levels of overweight and obesity continue to rise among adults in China.”

“The excess smoking-associated risk of diabetes among men in China is likely to increase substantially in future generations because the tobacco epidemic is maturing, but also because levels of overweight and obesity continue to rise among adults in China.”Professor Zhengming Chen, University of Oxford

Study co-author, Dr Fiona Bragg, from the University of Oxford, UK, added, “These findings add to existing evidence of the health benefits of giving up smoking, not only for prevention of cancer, respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, but now also for prevention of diabetes.” 

Smoking linked to disease directly or indirectly

Professor Liming Li from Peking University in China, pointed that although we cannot say that smoking causes diabetes, we can for sure say that it may be a contributing factor. “We can’t conclude from these findings that smoking causes type 2 diabetes, but, irrespective of this, smoking should be targeted as an important modifiable lifestyle factor in future disease prevention strategies, including for diabetes, in China and elsewhere.”

Read Further: University of Oxford

 

 

 

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2 COMMENTS

  1. In July of 2017. it was discovered that I got type 2 diabetes, By the end of the July month. I was given a prescription for the Metformin, I stated with the some diet and followed it completely for several weeks but was unable to get my blood sugar below 140, Without results to how for my hard work. I really panicked and called my doctor. His response?? Deal with it yourself, I started to feel that something wasn’t right and do my own research, Then I found Lisa’s great blog (google ” How I freed myself from diabetes ” ) .. I read it from cover to cover and I started with the diet and by the next week. my blood sugar was 100, Since then. I get a fasting reading between the mid 70s and 80s, My doctor was very surprised at the results that. the next week. he took me off the Metformin drug, I lost 16 pounds in my first month and lost more than 3+ inches off my waist and I’m able to work out twice a day while still having lots

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