The statement explained that this measure aims to protect teens from having access to vaping products. Up until now, in China, there were currently no regulations pertaining to the use and production management of e-cigarettes. In 2018, Chinese tobacco regulators urged the government to regulate the devices in the same way as other tobacco products.

Last September, Juul products were taken off Chinese e-commerce sites Tmall and JD.com, only after being launched days before.

At a press conference last Summer, head of the National Health Commission (NHC) planning department Mao Qunan, said that the organization was conducting research on the devices with the aim of regulating accordingly. “The supervision of electronic cigarettes must be severely strengthened,” he said at the time. The NHC “is working with relevant departments to conduct research on electronic cigarette supervision and we plan to regulate electronic cigarettes through legislation.”

Jerk reaction to US reports

Meanwhile, the newly announced directive has ordered online shopping platforms to remove vaping products from their sites. This measure certainly comes in response to all the scrutiny surrounding the devices as a result of the EVALI outbreak in the US. Last September, Juul products were taken off Chinese e-commerce sites Tmall and JD.com, only after being launched days before.

Additionally last month, US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar and acting FDA commissioner Ned Sharpless, met with Trump to discuss a total flavour ban. “The Trump Administration is making it clear that we intend to clear the market of flavored e-cigarettes to reverse the deeply concerning epidemic of youth e-cigarette use that is impacting children, families, schools and communities,” said Azar in a statement at the time.

Read Further: Bloomberg 

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