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Vapers in Thailand are faced with some of the harshest regulations worldwide. A ban on the import, export, sale and possession of vaping products has been in place since November 2014. Anyone caught breaking this law will have their items confiscated and fined or sent to prison for up to 10 years if convicted.

In fact only last December, two young adults were arrested in Pathum Thani for selling vaping products via Facebook. This has prompted many locals to speak up and even start a petition urging local lawmakers to review the ban whilst referring to regulations around the world such as in many EU countries, where at least (despite still unfair), vaping products are regulated as other tobacco products.

Public Health Ministry states strong position against e-cigarettes

The current e-cig import ban should be lifted in order to prevent illicit activity that ultimately forces vapers to purchase the products on the black market, where they are unregulated and possibly unsafe.
In response to this, the deputy director-general of the Public Health Ministry’s Disease Control Department Dr Assadang Ruay-archin, had released a statement wrongly stating that the products are as hazardous to one’s health as regular cigarettes, since they contain nicotine and are therefore as addictive.

 

When taking into account that regulations pertaining to combustible cigarettes (which are proven to be much more toxic than vaping products), are not close to being this harsh, such a stance is ironic to say the least.

The public should have the right to opt for safer alternatives

In line with this, earlier this week a number of academics and vaping advocates attended a seminar that was organized with the intention of discussing the use of e-cigarettes as tobacco alternatives. The debaters agreed that the government should adopt the same approach as the UK government, and allow the the use of vaping products for smoking cessation. They added that the government should recognize the public’s right to opt for safer alternatives.

The debate participants concluded that the current e-cigarette import ban should be lifted in order to prevent smuggling and illicit activity that ultimately forces vapers to purchase the products on the black market, where they are unregulated and therefore more likely to be unsafe.

Read Further: NNT

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