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The study titled, “Electronic Cigarette Use and Attempts to Quit Smoking Cigarettes Among Adolescents in Taiwan.”, was published in NCBI last month. Data was collected from the cross-sectional Taiwan Global Youth Tobacco Survey conducted annually between 2014 and 2016, which included adolescents aged between 12 and 18.

A US study had shown that current e-cigarette use in the States, was not only associated with higher quit attempts but also with greater smoking cessation success.
The researchers looked at e-cigarette use in the last 30 days, and compared it with attempts to quit smoking cigarettes during the previous 12 months. The results indicated that e-cigarette users were more likely to attempt quitting.

“Current e-cigarette use (OR = 1.21) was positively associated with attempts to quit cigarette smoking. Smokers who observed anti-tobacco media messages (OR = 1.12), attended anti-smoking classes (OR = 1.17), were influenced by warnings on cigarette packages (OR = 3.32), or received help to quit (OR = 3.11) were more likely to have attempted to quit cigarettes.”

US study yields similar results

Similarly, data extracted from two US population-based surveys, NIHS and TUS-CPS, had shown that current e-cigarette use in the States, was associated with higher quit attempts and also with greater smoking cessation success.

The NHIS results had indicated that current use of e-cigarettes was associated with a higher number of attempts to quit smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.87 to 2.81, p < .001) and greater smoking cessation (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.21 to 2.21, p = .001). And the TUS-CPS data showed a similar pattern, with current e-cigarette use being significantly associated with increased past-12-month quit attempts and with quitting successfully.

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