Recent research related to NRTs, has indicated that smokers who use higher doses of nicotine are more likely to quit than those using lower doses

“We’ve seen tobacco use among youth go down over the last decade, it’s now starting to go back up because of e-cigarettes,” said Dr. Jerome Adams. “It’s a fundamentally different product we have compared to the e-cigarettes of old,” he said.

Adams said that the fact that modern devices contain more nicotine is problematic. “It delivers much more nicotine, and we’re hearing from high school principals and from parents that kids out there now are becoming, rapidly becoming addicted to these products, so I’m worried the numbers are going to get worse this year.”

Meanwhile, a recent review of research related to NRTs, has indicated that smokers who use higher doses of nicotine are more likely to quit than those using lower doses. The review also found that some smokers may benefit from using two forms of NRT rather than one.

Higher levels of nicotine increase chances of quitting

A recent study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London indicated similar findings. The researchers followed 50 smokers in a tobacco dependence clinic in Argentina, as they tried to quit smoking. This was the first study to tailor nicotine dosing according to smokers’ choices as they try to quit, and the results suggested that most smokers using stop-smoking medications can tolerate doses that are up to four times higher than the ones recommended.

Thankfully, the Surgeon General recognises that e-cigarettes are successfully used by many to quit smoking, and that therefore caution must be exercised when implementing bans. “I’m worried that if we don’t really lean into it, then it’s going to limit adult access to these products among people who were smoking and using them to quit,” he said.

Read Further: The Hill

Advertisement

Book your ad here

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here